Posts tagged Tweed
Et Cetera | Pierre-Auguste Renoir
 
Picking Flowers, 1875

Picking Flowers, 1875

 
EXCERPT | Beginnings

Beginnings are sudden, but also insidious.
They creep up on you sideways, they keep to the shadows, they lurk unrecognized.
Then, later, they spring.

Atwood, M. (2000) The Blind Assassin

Excerpt | Grounded

It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.

Tolkien, J. R. R. (1955) The Lord of the Rings

Et Cetera | Wabi Sabi
 
Wabi Sabi Apartment, by Sergey Makhno Architects, 2018

Wabi Sabi Apartment, by Sergey Makhno Architects, 2018

 
Excerpt | Today

is only one day in all the days that will ever be.
but what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today.


hemingway, e. (1940) for whom the bell tolls

Excerpt | The Primacy of Perception

to see is to enter a universe of beings which display themselves, and they would not do this if they could not be hidden behind each other or behind me. in other words: to look at an object is to inhabit it, and from this habitation to grasp all things in terms of the aspect which they present to it. but in so far as i see those things too, they remain abodes open to my gaze, and being potentially lodged in them, i already perceive from various angles the central object of my present vision. thus every object is the mirror of all others.

merleau-ponty, m. (1945) the phenomenology of perception

Excerpt | Electric Vehicle

one of the rare industries that electricity has failed to dominate is automobile production, but a review of the early story of the car suggests that this was by no means inevitable. the first crude examples of electric vehicles had been demon- started as early as the 1830s by pioneers such as scotsman robert davidson and american thomas davenport, and electric cars — by then refined by numerous other inventors.
in both the US and Europe — were increasingly available to consumers by the last decade of the nineteenth century. touted as cleaner, quieter, more reliable, and easier to operate, electric cars enjoyed a popularity that easily rivaled their gas and steam counterparts; in 1900, of the 4,192 vehicles manufactured in the US, 1,575 were electric, 936 were gasoline-driven, and 1,681 were steam-powered. electric cars also held the world land speed record from its official inception in 1898 until 1902, when a steam-powered car took the record.
despite this propitious beginning, a little less than two decades later the electric car was on the wane — in 1913, for example, more than eighty electric car models were available on the u.s market; just four years later, that number had dwindled to barely twenty. several factors contributed to why internal combustion vehicles came to dominate the automobile market so completely: gas prices dropped with the rigging of crude oil in texas; henry ford’s new production techniques made gas automobiles suddenly far cheaper than electric cars; and america’s burgeoning road culture made speed and convenience at long distances the decisive criteria for customers’ choices. although the brief revival of the electric car in the 1970s was ultimately not sustained, recent trends in automotive technology suggest that electric cars may have better luck in the twenty-first century.
 

cabinet. (2006) issue 21, electricity. page 62 'the early history of the electric vehicle'.